Proposal to Occupy Oakland General Assembly

This  proposal that was passed at the Occupy Oakland General Assembly, on Monday, January 9th

PROPOSAL

Summary

We are calling for February 20th, 2012 to be a “National Occupy Day in Support of Prisoners.”

In the Bay Area we will “Occupy San Quentin,” to stand in solidarity with the people confined within its walls and to demand the end of the incarceration as a means of containing those dispossessed by unjust social policies.

Reasons

Prisons have become a central institution in American society, integral to our politics, economy and our culture.

Between 1976 and 2000, the United States built on average a new prison each week and the number of imprisoned Americans increased tenfold.

Prison has made the threat of torture part of everyday life for millions of individuals in the United States, especially the 7.3 million people—who are disproportionately people of color—currently incarcerated or under correctional supervision.

Imprisonment itself is a form of torture. The typical American prison, juvenile hall and detainment camp is designed to maximize degradation, brutalization, and dehumanization.

Mass incarceration is the new Jim Crow. Between 1970 and 1995, the incarceration of African Americans increased 7 times. Currently African Americans make up 12 % of the population in the U.S. but 53% of the nation’s prison population. There are more African Americans under correctional control today—in prison or jail, on probation or parole—than were enslaved in 1850, a decade before the Civil War began.

The prison system is the most visible example of policies of punitive containment of the most marginalized and oppressed in our society. Prior to incarceration, 2/3 of all prisoners lived in conditions of economic hardship. While the perpetrators of white-collar crime largely go free.

In addition, the Center for Economic and Policy Research estimated that in 2008 alone there was a loss in economic input associated with people released from prison equal to $57 billion to $65 billion.

We call on Occupies across the country to support:

1.  Abolishing unjust sentences, such as the Death Penalty, Life Without the Possibility of Parole, Three Strikes, Juvenile Life Without Parole, and the practice of trying children as adults.

2.  Standing in solidarity with movements initiated by prisoners and taking action to support prisoner demands, including the Georgia Prison Strike and the Pelican Bay/California Prisoners Hunger Strikes.

3.  Freeing political prisoners, such as Mumia Abu-Jamal, Leonard Peltier, Lynne Stewart, Bradley Manning and Romaine “Chip” Fitzgerald, a Black Panther Party member incarcerated since 1969.

4. Demanding an end to the repression of activists, specifically the targeting of African Americans and those with histories of incarceration, such as Khali in Occupy Oakland who could now face a life sentence, on trumped-up charges, and many others being falsely charged after only exercising their First Amendment rights.

5. Demanding an end to the brutality of the current system, including the torture of those who have lived for many years in Secured Housing Units (SHUs) or in solitary confinement.

6. Demanding that our tax money spent on isolating, harming and killing prisoners, instead be invested in improving the quality of life for all and be spent on education, housing, health care, mental health care and other human services which contribute to the public good.

Bay Area

On February 20th, 2012 we will organize in front of San Quentin, where male death-row prisoners are housed, where Stanley Tookie Williams was immorally executed by the State of California in 2005, and where Kevin Cooper, an innocent man on death row, is currently imprisoned.

At this demonstration, through prisoners’ writings and other artistic and political expressions, we will express the voices of the people who have been inside the walls. The organizers of this action will reach out to the community for support and participation. We will contact social service organizations, faith institutions, labor organizations, schools, prisoners, former prisoners and their family members.

National and International Outreach

We will reach out to Occupies across the country to have similar demonstrations outside of prisons, jails, juvenile halls and detainment facilities or other actions as such groups deem appropriate.  We will also reach out to Occupies outside of the United States and will seek to attract international attention and support.

We have chosen Monday, February 20, 2012 at San Quentin, because it is a non-weekend day.  Presidents’ Day avoids the weekend conflict with prisoners’ visitation, which would likely be shut down if we held a demonstration over the weekend.


2 thoughts on “Proposal to Occupy Oakland General Assembly

  1. HELLO my name is darlene n my son joshua wiley AH6150.. CALIF. SENT TO TCCF in MISSISSIPPI HE NEVER COMPLAINS BUT HERE THEY ARE MISTREATED AND ABUSED BY THE CORRECTION AL OFFICERS AND IT SOMETIMES ENDS FATAL OR VERY VERY BAD THE COPS HAVE NO COMPASSION N THEY CUSS THEM ALWAYS HE HAS BEEN THERE BOUT 3 MONTHS N HAS NOT BEEN TO A YARD YET THEY STUFF ALL OF THEMIN THE GYM .. HE IS ALONE N HASNT BEEN MOVED THEY ARE LOCKED DOWN INDEFINITE. HE IS A LONE NATIVE INDIAN IN THIS SITUATION AND BEGINNING TO GET SCARED . HE SAYS IT HAS TO GET REAL WORSE BEFORE IT GETS BETTER . SPMETHING HAS TO BE DONE THE INMATES ARE HUNGRY AND MISTREATED WAY OVER THERE . WHY IS HE SO FAR AWAY HIS FAMILY CANNOT EVEN VISIT HIM … I AM A VERY FRIGHTEND MOTHER FOR HER SON AND THE REST OF THE INMATES.

  2. […] Feb. 20 as part of a national day of action, “Occupy 4 Prisoners”, that emerged from a January general assembly at Occupy Oakland. The Occupy for Prisoners call to action was informed by a letter from Kevin Cooper, a prisoner on […]

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